Join the Fall DH Challenge #bdhwgchallenge

Hi all,

Some of us wanted to continue the spirit of the BDHWG summer challenge group throughout this fall semester. Need a little community and motivation to work on your dh projects? Curious about what others are doing? Join the Fall DH Challenge Group!

Every other Friday we will meet at the D-lab collaboratory to work on our specific DH goals, help each other trouble shoot issues, and keep each other motivated throughout the semester. Everyone and all types of goals are welcomed.

The first working day is this Friday 9/25, 11AM-1PM. Bring a lunch and your DH goals!

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Be part of a support group who will set concrete academic, DH, and professional goals and motivate one another throughout the semester. Summer challenge is open to all.

Open rules:
1. Set realistic, small, practical goals related to DH or general academia to be completed every two weeks. (Deadlines/D-lab check in dates: 9/25, 10/9, 10/16 (BDHWG Hackerspace), 10/23, 11/6, 11/20, 12/4)
2. Post your goals to this google doc and check off your accomplishments throughout the semester.
3. Come work at D-lab every other Friday 11AM-1PM. If you cannot make it, communicate and motivate one another through the chat function on google docs (right side) or write comments in the ‘smiley face emoticon’ columns. Communicate on twitter with #bdhwgchallenge

4. If you need the extra motivation, check off on the google doc that you will submit a $10 monetary commitment stating that you will work on your goals (lest have the money go towards a group victory money pot).

Join the BDHWG Summer Challenge Group

DH Working Group at DHSI in Victoria, Canada

DH Working Group at DHSI in Victoria, Canada

Summer usually means the time to ‘catch up’ and finally get cracking on those little side projects that often get pushed to the side during the year. Join the BDHWG working group on our DH Summer Challenge. Be part of a support group who will set concrete academic, DH, and professional goals and motivate one another throughout the summer.  Summer challenge is open to all, and our current group includes some DH friends from off-campus.

Open rules:
1. Set realistic, small, practical goals related to DH or general academia to be completed every two weeks. (Deadlines: July 1, July 15, July 29, August 12, August 19)
2. Post your goals to this google doc and check off your accomplishments throughout the summer.
3. Motivate one another through the chat function on google docs (right side) or write comments in the ‘smiley face emoticon’ columns. Communicate on twitter with #bdhwgsummer
4. If you need the extra motivation, check off on the google doc that you will submit a $10 monetary commitment stating that you will work on your goals (lest have the money go towards a group victory money pot).

Save the Date! Berkeley DH Faire 2015

On April 7th and 8th, please join the Berkeley DH community for a special two-day Digital Humanities Faire . Over the past few years, the digital humanities community at Berkeley has grown exponentially across disciplines. This event will serve to connect established digital humanities scholars, interested graduate students, the libraries and support staff in discussions about methods, resources, and current projects. The poster session will be on April 8, 2015  Social Science Matrix, 8th Floor Barrows Hall, UC Berkeley and will be the culminating event of the two day faire. Please join us in conversation regarding the landscape and opportunities of digital humanities at UC Berkeley.

April 7, 2015 9:30-11AM | 180 Doe Library

A Panel Discussion on Digitally Supported Research and Pedagogy hosted by the Library.

April 8, 2015 3:10-6:00PM | Social Science Matrix, 8th Floor Barrows Hall

  • Keynote address by Professor Zephyr Frank, Department of History, Spatial History Project at Stanford University
  • A panel discussion on Landscape of Berkeley DH with Elizabeth Honig, Laurie Pearce, Francesco Spagnolo, moderated by Cathryn Carson.
  • Poster presentation of current digital humanities projects. Please RSVP here .

This event is co-sponsored by Computing and the Practice of History, the History Department, Digital Humanities at Berkeley (a collaboration between Research IT and the Dean of Arts and Humanities), Digital Humanities Fellows, the D-Lab, Social Science Matrix, the Townsend Center for the Humanities, and the Library.

News and Events

  • Thank you to everyone who attended the DH at Berkeley launch event at the Magnes!

  • DH Grants for Spring 2015 have been announced.  Explore the descriptions of collaborative research, new course, and new course component grants awarded this semester here .

  • Two works of Berkeley scholarship have been nominated for the DH Awards . Voting is open to the public until February 28th .

  • Interested in building a project site in Drupal?  Work on training and get help at the new Drupal Working Group or get your foundations Rochelle Terman’s 3-part “Basics of Drupal” workshop at the D-Lab, starting March 4th . See the DH at Berkeley blog for more information .

BDHWG Meeting: Daniel Viragh, The Historical GIS Project | February 27 | 12 – 1 PM | D-Lab Convening Room, 356 Barrows

The Berkeley Digital Humanities Working Group is pleased to welcome Daniel Viragh, post-doctoral fellow at the Magnes Collection for Jewish Art and Life and alumnus of Cal’s History Department.  Daniel will be presenting The Historical GIS Project , an ongoing work with a team of undergraduate research apprentices to build a historical geo-database of Budapest in 1896.  Working from the bottom up, the team digitized data from an 1896 map of the city and a book-length listing of the city’s commercial, industrial, and government resources.  Daniel will provide a brief overview of the multi-stage process of cleaning and mapping the data.  He will also discuss the research questions he addresses by working with geospatial analysis.

Researchers interested in pursuing this work are strongly encouraged to attend the following workshops at the D-Lab as well:

  • 2/24: Starting a Historical GIS Project , Daniel Viragh

  • 3/9: Intro to Data Visualization in ArcGIS, Kelly Clonts

  • 3/9: Working with US Census Data, Kelly Clonts

  • 3/10: Georeferencing with ArcGIS, Susan Powell, GIS & Map Librarian

UC Berkeley affiliates can obtain a one-year license for ArcGIS (Windows only) from the Geospatial Innovation Facility .

Seminar: Cultural Data in the Age of Experience | February 27 | 3 – 5 PM | 107 South Hall

This presentation examines new paradigms for transforming digital cultural heritage archives into embodied experiences for cultural organizations. Using heterogeneous datasets representing intangible and tangible heritage, the research described integrated groundbreaking work in new museology through virtual environment design, interactivity, information visualization, visual analytics, and data mining.  The discussion comprises a series of seminal installations and permanent exhibits. Read more

Lecture : Mike Furlough, Executive Director of the HathiTrust, “HathiTrust, Collective Action, and Local Services” | February 26th | 9 AM | Doe Library 180

This talk is intended to provide an overview of HathiTrust and an opportunity to discuss how it can better support research and teaching at University of California, Berkeley. Since its founding in 2008 HathiTrust has aspired to build a sustainable program of collective stewardship for library collections in the United States and around the world. Mike Furlough will review the organization’s membership structure, services, and collections. The second half of the talk will highlight several major initiatives now underway, which are intended expand access to US federal documents, enable computational research across millions of digitized texts, and catalyze new collective action to manage the print record. Read more

Training Highlights

D-Lab

Geospatial Analysis:

  • 2/24 : Starting a Historical GIS Project

  • 3/9 : Georeferencing with QGIS

  • 3/9 : Working with US Census Data

  • 3/10 : Georeferencing with ArcGIS

  • 3/16 : Intro to Data Visualization in ArcGIS

Qualitative Methods:

  • 3/13 : From Coding Qualitative Data to Analyzing It

  • 3/19 : QMG Presents: Triangulating Across Qualitative Data Sources

  • 4/10 : Intro to Qualitative Data Analysis: Coding and Technology

  • 4/17 : Qualitative Data Analysis with Atlas.TI

  • 4/24 : From Coding Qualitative Data to Analyzing it

R

  • 2/27 : Exploratory Plotting and Data Analysis in R

  • 3/12 : Useful Stuff in R

  • 4/9 : R Graphics

Geospatial Innovation Facility

  • 2/23: Intro to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Social Science Focus

  • 4/6: Intro to Open Source GIS: Working with QGIS

  • 4/20: Creating your own web maps

  • 5/20 – 5/22: Spatial Data Science Bootcamp (applications due 3/16)

Working Groups

Want to share something in the Week in DH?  Send an email to [email protected]

News & Events

BDHWG: Ted Underwood Feb. 12 | D-Lab Convening Room (356 Barrows)

We are pleased to be co-hosting Ted Underwood (U. Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) with Computing and the Practice of History.  Ted’s research combines information science and literary criticism through the application of machine learning algorithms to large digital collections. There will be two events (see attached):

  • 11 – 12 PM :  A small seminar (please ): Digital Methods + Your Research: The Possibilities and Challenges of (Your) Digital Humanities Projects

  • 12:15 – 1:30 PM : A brownbag discussion : Quantitative Social Sciences for the Humanities: How Much Does “the Digital” Matter for Distant Reading?

BDHWG: Project Lightning Talks Feb. 13 | 12 – 1 PM | D-Lab Convening Room (356 Barrows)

BDHWG is great place to workshop ideas, troubleshoot and try out new things in a supportive space.  Let’s check in and hear what folks are working on this semester with informal 5 minute lightning talks.  Don’t worry about how “finished” your project is–it’s still very helpful to see early-stage projects.  If you’re interested in presenting, please see our blog for more info.

DH at Berkeley: Launching Digital Humanities at Berkeley & Opening The Future of Memory ( by Feb. 13 )
Feb. 18 | 5 – 8 PM | Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life, 2121 Allston Way

You are cordially invited to for Digital Humanities at Berkeley.  This event will also celebrate the opening of The Future of Memory : Jewish Culture in the Digital Age at the Magnes Collection.The project includes an installation, exhibition, and digital research lab in which museum professionals, scholars, students, and the public, discuss the meaning of memory and the many facets of digital history. Please by Feb. 13 .

News: Mary Elings Presents #HackFSM at the Coalition for Networked Information

Mary Elings recently participated in a presentation on digital humanities and the archives at the Coalition for Networked Information ( read more )

Digital Humanities and Egyptology Workshop (see attached)

Feb. 13 | 10 AM – 1 PM | 373 Bancroft Library

Willeke Wendrich, UCLA: Ancient Egypt Online: Data, Metadata and Quality of Information
Mark Depauw, KU Leuven: Trismegistos and Ancient Egypt: Bridging Academia and Collections

Rita Lucarelli, UC Berkeley: The Materiality of the Book of the Dead: Mapping Ancient Texts on Objects through 3D Visualization Techniques

PopUp Exhibition at the Magnes: Anne Wootton and the Power of Searchable Sound

Feb. 18 | 12 – 1 PM | Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life, 2121 Allston Way

We search text all the time — why can’t we search speech? This thought led I Anne Wootton in 2012 to co-found Pop Up Archive , a Bay Area startup whose software allows users to automatically transcribe, index and tag sound files from anywhere on the web, making the sound searchable to the second.  Pop Up Archive has processed over 700,000 minutes of audio in the past two years. Several of the Magnes’s sound holdings are included in Pop Up Archive’s public index, including the reel-to-reel recordings of Israeli leaders speaking in San Francisco at dinners organized in the 1950s and 1960s by the Israel Bonds Corporation of America and several oral histories originally commissioned by the Magnes. Anne’s presentation will showcase the power of audio transcription and the value it has for scholarly research today.

Training Highlights:

D-Lab

  • 2/13 : Double Feature: Network Analysis & Visualization AND Managing Your Research Like a Boss

  • 2/26 : Reference Management with Zotero

  • 2/27 : Life Cycle of a Text Analysis Project

  • 3/4, 3/11, 3/18 : Basics of Drupal (3-part series)

Qualitative Methods:

  • 2/18 : QMG Presents: Integrating Quantitative Data in Qualitative Research

  • 2/20 : Qualitative Data Analysis with Atlas.TI

  • 3/13 : From Coding Qualitative Data to Analyzing It

R:

  • 2/11 : Useful Stuff in R

  • 2/18 : R Graphics

  • 2/27 : Exploratory Plotting and Data Analysis in R

Geospatial Innovation Facility

  • 2/23: Intro to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Social Science Focus

  • 4/6: Intro to Open Source GIS: Working with QGIS

  • 4/20: Creating your own web maps

  • 5/20 – 5/22: Spatial Data Science Bootcamp (applications due 3/16)

Working Groups

Welcome back OG BDHWG coordinator Scott McGinnis for a discussion on XML

Join the Digital Humanities Working Group this Monday, November 17 1-2PM (D-Lab 356 Barrows) for coffee/tea and discussion led by Scott McGinnis on XML and its uses in the humanities!

xml-and-its-uses

<XML>, and its uses in the humanities </XML>
The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is one of the fundamental standards in information technology, and along with SQL, Python, and a few others, XML is one of the most widely used in the digital humanities. In this informal talk, Scott Paul McGinnis (PhD. Candidate in History, UC Berkeley) will introduce XML for a humanities audience, discuss why a researcher might want to learn it, and show some examples from projects in the digital humanities and in his own research on early Chinese history.

Kicking Off the 2014 – 2015 Digital Humanities Working Group

Digital humanities uses digital methods and tools to answer old questions and raise new ones.  The DH Working Group brings together students, faculty, and staff to explore the exciting field of digital humanities and to apply new methods to develop research questions and projects. We welcome everyone regardless of discipline and technical background. We’re a low-stakes, no-prep group excited to play with new ideas and learn from one another.

We are hoping to have our first meeting during the week of September 8th.  We will showcase a few DH tools and projects, especially those led by UC Berkeley students and staff all over campus.  The first meeting will also have an open discussion about topics of interest useful to your discipline and preferences.

Please fill out the following Doodle poll with your general availability. We will send out an email with the confirmed date and time no later than Sunday, September 7th.

Events to look out for this semester:

  • HackTheHearst – an interdisciplinary hackathon for the Phoebe. A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology  (Sep. 10th – 21st)
  • Workshop  – Databases, Data Management, and SQL (Oct.)
  • Workshop – XML and Its Uses (Nov.)
  • Python Codecademy sprint
  • Workshop – Leveraging Social Media for Academics
  • Workshop – Digital Research Methods

Past events have included workshops on digital research methods, such as text mining and network analysis, and discussions around digital collaboration and open source.  Last spring, we helped organize HackFSM , a hackathon for the Free Speech Movement Digital Archive.